Author: Amorim Cork South Africa

It was interesting and informative to see South African wine lovers reflecting the world-wide trend of choosing natural cork as the preferred closure for their bottle of wine. In the first reader survey done by www.winemag.co.za, one of the leading authorities on South African wine news, trends and opinions, 61% of readers stated natural cork as their closure of choice -  that figure increasing to more than two thirds of respondents if technical cork stoppers are included.

Despite all the long-hours, sweat and hard-work, there is something magical about the harvest season. For us in the cork industry, it lies in the satisfaction of seeing the just-cut bark from the cork oaks arriving at our plants in southern Portugal to be processed. It smells of earth and fresh wood, a truly natural product from wild forests, each tree stripped of its bark every nine years.

With the current global demand for cork stoppers surpassing 12bn units annually and the wine market’s upward growing curve, the world’s leading cork-company Amorim is going back to basics to ensure sufficient supply of quality product for the years ahead. And by going back to basics we are talking about the source of cork, namely the quercus suber, also known as the cork oak tree. Speaking to the popular Grandes Escolhas Magazine, Antonio Amorim, president of Amorim Cork told of the company’s plans to ensure unhindered supply of product from a new generation of cork forests.

In a repeat performance from 2014, Domaine des Dieux, the boutique wine producer in the Hemel-en-Aarde Valley near Hermanus, was crowned as South Africa’s best Cap Classique exponent at this year’s Amorim Cap Classique Challenge. The Domaine des Dieux Claudia Brut MCC 2012, a blend of Pinot Noir and Chardonnay, won the category for Best Brut Blend as well as Best Producer having achieved the highest score of all the 127 wines entered into this year’s rendition of the Amorim Cap Classique Challenge.

The biggest wine exhibition in the southern hemisphere, they call it. But Cape Wine 2018 is arguably the most interesting, too. Wine buyers, sommeliers and journalists flew in from all corners of the globe where hundreds of South African wine producers were waiting to introduce them to the diversity, class and quality of the country’s industry.