Blog & News

Stellenbosch winery Kleine Zalze, one of the most commercially successful and award-winning Cape cellars, etched a place in South African wine history by winning the award for Best Producer at the Amorim Cap Classique Challenge which this year celebrates its 20th anniversary as the country's...

Year 2021 is proving to be a major celebratory one for Cap Classique, the South African sector of bottle-fermented sparkling wines. Not only does this year see the 50th anniversary of the birth of Cap Classique being celebrated, but the category’s leading competition, the Amorim...

A rare bottle of 37,5cl of Grand Constance 1821 stopped the auctioneer’s gavel at a phenomenal price of R420 000 (€25 000) at this year’s Cape Fine and Rare Wine Auction. Under supervision of French wine expert Jean Vincent Ridon, this 200-year-old wine treasure was one of the three...

 Natural, sustainable cork-tile flooring donated by Amorim Cork has been laid-out in two of the classrooms at the Sustainability Institute in Lynedoch, Stellenbosch. Founded in 1999, the Institute is an international living and learning centre teaching, exploring and applying ways of being that are restorative. Its focus on children is centred within the Lynedoch Children’s House, Lynedoch Primary Schools and Lynedoch Youth programmes.
The fashion of cork footwear has come a long way from the chunky platform cork soles worn by willowy women in the 1960s and 1970s. Thanks to designers such as Reefer, a young, dynamic and unique South African shoe brand, cork’s diverse ability to inspire footwear that is both functional and fashionable has seen this venerable Portuguese product putting its best foot forward.

The recent death of Allan Mullins leaves a hole in the wine world that is not going to be filled. For Amorim, Allan was an especial source of inspiration and endearing colleague due to his love for and knowledge of Cap Classique, a South African...

A testimonial from M. Jean Marie Aurand, the Chairman of the Académie Amorim and honorary Managing Director of the International Organisation of Vine and Wine (OIV). I see the cork stopper as much more than a mere stopper. When it is pulled from the bottle, it releases the full aromas of the wine, to which it has also contributed. It is an indispensable pre-requisite for a good tasting experience. It has proved its worth over time and is an incomparable symbol of quality. Is there anything better than the cork stopper to add value to a bottle of wine? Is there anything that better conveys the profound emotion of a winetasting event?